VERMONT MOOSE POPULATION UNDER THREAT FROM CLIMATE CHANGE

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The state of Vermont is starting a three year study on moose populations. This study will continue until the inception of 2019. Climate change is for real and it is causing certain deleterious effects in moose herds. The moose herds are under a lot of stress due to disruptions in weather patterns.

The high temperatures simply do not allow the moose populations to thrive in a normal manner. Also seasonal changes such as warm fall months and premature spring seasons lead to rising winter tick numbers. These cause problems in the moose populations.

The health of the moose herds is going downhill. The winter tick is a parasite and tens of thousands of these can be sucking the blood of a single moose. This makes this parasite especially dangerous. It is a general nuisance and an annoying agent.

The moose which are ridden with these ticks are subject to a lot of blood loss. To get rid of these ticks, the moose engage in friction against tree trunks. This causes their furry coats to wear off and thus they are left prey to cold temperatures.

Radio collars were attached to 60 wild moose in the study by Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department. The population migrations and deaths of these moose were noted down with accuracy.

After the moose were caught by nets using helicopters, they were labeled and then released in the wild. The moose population also has several predators including coyotes and bears.

Also brainworm infections and stress due to tick infestations were causes of mortality among these moose. The mating patterns and life trends of these moose populations were turned topsy turvy due to climate change.

The moose population is facing warmer temperatures, parasitic infections and a disintegration of their habitats. A thorough understanding of these creatures is necessary in order to save them from entering the Endangered Species list.

A decade and a half ago, the moose community stood at 5000. Today that has dwindled to 2200. This is cause for sadness. The state of Vermont still allows these moose to be hunted despite their numbers going down.

Also there are a number of accidents with vehicles that the moose end up in each year. The study that is being carried out took a large fund of money to get off the ground. Hopefully, it will prove a worthy conservation effort in the end.

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